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Self Harm

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Self-harm is a growing problem internationally. It is common, particularly in young adults. Of people who die by suicide, over half have a history of self-harm. Some will have presented to hospital with self-harm in the preceding year. Those who present to hospital after harming themselves are found to have mental health problems, substance misuse and personality disorder. Most people who self-harm face acute life problems and will have long-term difficulties. Self-harm is distressing for both patients and their families and friends, and places large demands on clinical services. Finding effective aftercare for individuals who self-harm is therefore important and CBT is one of the more effective interventions and can results in fewer individuals repeating self-harm.

The workshop is aimed at helping clinicians develop particular skills to work with individuals who have recently self-harmed and who are likely to be at risk of suicide. Specific psychological factors that increase vulnerability to self-harm will be illustrated and explored. Through experiential and practical exercises, participants will understand how psychological factors may affect patients who self-harm.

Location Reading
Category Talking Therapies
Details of Event
Start date 13 Nov 2020
Start time 9:00am
Venue Address University of Reading - Whiteknights campus
Cost
Amount £130
About
Organiser Charlie Waller Institute
Speaker Professor Kate Davidson
Website http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/files/charliewaller/Workshop_Flyer_-_KD131120.pdf
Contact No. 0118 378 7537
Email cwi@reading.ac.uk
Keywords Cognitive Behavioraltherapy (CBT), Counselling, Psychological, Psychology, Psychotherapy, Self-Harm
Regions South East

 

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